Monday, January 23, 2012

The Golden Notebook.













I have always been in love with old book cover art... especially those blurred and surreal photos or strange paintings that look so... not commercial by today's standards of bubbly bright lettering and crispy hyper-real images.

Lately though, my book obsession is with audio books. It feeds my need to multitask and it is a great companion when I have my eyes glued to the page drawing. I was so pleased to see the original cover of the Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing above. I've started listening to the audio book, read by narrator Juliet Stevenson who has the voice of velvet.  Its a long meandering tale so far, and it seems that most either love it or hate it.   Its a long devil of a book, with the audio version lasting over 27 hours (where most only go for 5-10 hours).  

It has been regarded as a canonical novel of the 20th century exploring women's lib movements, sexual politics, communism, and mental and societal breakdown in modern times.    Below is the plot summary:


The Golden Notebook is the story of writer Anna Wulf, the four notebooks in which she keeps the record of her life, and her attempt to tie them all together in a fifth, gold-colored notebook. The book intersperses segments of an ostensibly realistic narrative of the lives of Molly and Anna, and their children, ex-husbands and lovers—entitled Free Women—with excerpts from Anna's four notebooks, coloured black (of Anna's experience in Central Africa, before and during WWII, which inspired her own bestselling novel), red (of her experience as a member of the Communist Party), yellow (an ongoing novel that is being written based on the painful ending of Anna's own love affair), and blue (Anna's personal journal where she records her memories, dreams, and emotional life). Each notebook is returned to four times, interspersed with episodes from Free Women, creating non-chronological, overlapping sections that interact with one another. This post-modernistic styling, with its space and room for "play" engaging the characters and readers, is among the most famous features of the book, although Lessing insisted that readers and reviewers pay attention to the serious themes in the novel.
(Via Wikipedia)

3 comments:

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Just found your blog, and so glad that I did! I love old book cover art & illustrations as well, and really just love all your inspirations here! Lovely lovely style. xx

Lise.silva said... Best Blogger Tips[Reply to comment]Best Blogger Templates

@Sara Thanks, Sara! x

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